Angus HER - NO34NE0001 - GLAMIS CASTLE

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Main Details

Primary ReferenceNO34NE0001
NameGLAMIS CASTLE
NRHE Card No.NO34NE1
NRHE Numlink 32055
HES SM No.
HES LB No. 11701
Site Form Standing Structure
Site Condition Complete 2
Details Castle, still in use, probably on the site of an earlier building thought to date from the 11th century, set within a designed landscape (NO34NE0088). The land was granted by Robert II to John Lyon in 1372, at which time the earlier building would have been the main residence. Construction of the Grant Tower, a large L-plan tower house, began in 1435 by Patrick, who in 1445 became first Lord Glamis. His death in 1459 caused constructed to stop for a time, but it was finished by his widow before her death in 1484. Around the same time the Great Hall was added to the south of the tower. In the mid-16th century, the Grand Hall and the south-east hall block were joined by a short link, creating a Z-plan building. The Great Tower was remodelled and heightened in 1606 (dated). The east wing was added in 1629 and the west wing added in 1670-89. A north-east corner wing with a chapel was added in 1679-83. Three ditches also surrounded the castle, but they were filled up in the 17th century when considerable changes were made. The west wing was demolished in 1775, and rebuilt in 1798-1801. The north-east corner wing was restored in 1866, and a Baronial wing to the east added in 1891. It is shown on the 1st and 2nd edition OS maps as having two quadrangular sections with internal courts, and a wing projecting to the west. It was used as a Red Cross Auxiliary Hospital during World War I. The castle is constructed from red sandstone. The L-plan main block has a central stair tower in the re-entrant angle and an ogee caphouse, pinnacled turrets and a roofwalk with decorative wrought-iron railings and finials. There are two-storey and basement, four-bay battlemented angle wings with outer towers and corbelled turrets. The east wing is a lower three-storey and attic, seven-bay crowstepped wing, with a two-storey service wing. The main south elevation features a studded timber door with an iron knocker dated 1687, and a carved panel with Royal Arms below a circular niche containing the bust of Patrick 1st East of Strathmore. The north elevation of the main block has crowstepped dormer-heads and a corbelled turret to the outer east angle. There is stained glass to the chapel and dining room. The roofs are grey slates, and there are coped ashlar stacks and ashlar-coped skews with crowsteps, moulded skewputts and stone finials.
Last Update12/12/2016
Updated Bynackerman
Compiler 
Date of Compilation 

Easting: 338608.737950083, Northing: 748064.969898359

Google Map for NO34NE0001

National Grid Reference: NO 3860 4806



Event Details


Excavations and Surveys

Date MDate YTypeDurationDirector / OrganisationAuspicesFundExtent
121969  WDJOS  
 2002  D Bowler SUATSUADEV 

Artefact and Ecofact

Ecofact

Samples
Palynology
Ecofact Notes

Monument Types

Monument Type 1Monument Type 2Monument Type 3OrderProbability
CASTLESSANDSTONE A100
TOWERS L-PLANB100
TOWERSSTAIR C100
DITCHES SITE OFD100
COURTSINTERNAL I100
BUILDINGS SITE OFE100
TOWERHOUSES  F100
CHAPELS  G100
WINGSBARONIAL H100
HOSPITALSAUXILIARYRED CROSSJ100
HOSPITALSWORLD WAR I K100
CAP-HOUSESOGEE L100
RAILINGSWROUGHT-IRONDECORATIVEM100
FINIALSWROUGHT-IRON N100
WINGSANGLEBATTLEMENTEDO100
TURRETS CORBELLEDP100
WINGS CROW-STEPPEDQ100
WINGSSERVICE R100
DOORSTIMBERSTUDDEDS100
PANELSARMORIAL T100
NICHESCIRCULAR U100
BUSTS  V100
DORMER-HEADS CROW-STEPPEDW100
WINDOWSSTAINED-GLASS X100
ROOFSSLATE Y100
STACKSASHLARCOPEDZ100
SKEWPUTTS MOULDEDAA100
FINIALSSTONE AB100